Can Alcohol Cause Heart Attack?

Robert Gerchalk

Robert is our health care professional reviewer of this website. He worked for many years in mental health and substance abuse facilities in Florida, as well as in home health (medical and psychiatric), and took care of people with medical and addictions problems at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He has a nursing and business/technology degrees from The Johns Hopkins University.

Think you have a drinking problem?

If you suspect you might have a drinking problem, don't wait to seek help. Call our hotline now for confidential advice, support, and the first step towards understanding your relationship with alcohol and beginning your journey to recovery.

Can Alcoholism Cause Heart Attack?

It is no secret that alcohol abuse can lead to a number of serious health problems, including liver damage, cancer, and brain damage. But can alcoholism also cause heart attack?

The answer is yes. Alcoholism can cause heart attack by damaging the heart muscle. This damage can lead to a condition called cardiomyopathy, which can ultimately lead to heart failure.

In addition to damaging the heart muscle, alcoholism can also lead to high blood pressure, which is another risk factor for heart attack.

If you or someone you love is struggling with alcoholism, it is important to get help as soon as possible. There are many resources available to help you or your loved one get on the road to recovery.

Yes, alcoholism can cause heart attack. Alcoholism is a major risk factor for heart disease. People who drink excessively are more likely to develop high blood pressure, arrhythmias, and other heart problems. Alcohol can also damage the heart muscle, leading to heart failure. In addition, alcoholics are more likely to suffer from strokes.

If you or someone you know is struggling with alcoholism, please get help. There are many resources available to those who need assistance. Alcoholism is a serious disease that can lead to death if left untreated.

Concerned About Your Drinking?

We Can Help!

Understanding your relationship with alcohol is the first step towards making informed decisions about your health and well-being. Whether you’re questioning your drinking habits or seeking support, we’re here to help.